Archive for June, 2012

30Jun

HOT!!!

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I returned to the Florida Sea Base at about 20:30 last night.  The skies were clear and there was a gentle breeze from the west.  The temperature was 84ºF with a heat index of 90.  It was 94º inside Escape.  I turned on both air conditioning units and was sweating like a pig long before I got anywhere close to unpacked.  At 1 minute after midnight the a/c finally cycled off for the first time as the cabin temperature cooled to 75º.

Thanks to everyone for the support and congratulations.  Our next step is to put my PADI Course Director certification to good use at the Florida Sea Base.  Divemaster Scott Patton has expressed interest in being in the inaugural Florida Sea Base/ PADI Instructor Development Course.  Richard Goldman, David Ball and maybe even Captain Alex Bergstedt are on the list to promote from Master Scuba Diver Trainers to Instructor Development Course Staff Instructors.  I have a few things to work out with PADI Regional Manager Mike Kurczewski and the PADI International Retail and Resort Association about upgrading the Florida Sea Base from PADI 5 Star Resort to PADI 5 Star IDC Resort.  Then I have to work on pricing and scheduling.  MAYBE I can put something together for this fall or January.  I’m already working on it. 🙂

In weather news, Invest 97L is on the horizon.  It is too far away to be of major concern.  We will, as always, keep an eye on this  system.

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Dr. Masters must be away.  He had a guest blogger post for him:

By Angela Fritz

 Published: 2:53 PM EDT on June 29, 2012

Invest 97L

A tropical wave in the central main development region of the North Atlantic is still producing thunderstorm activity as it moves west, and the National Hurricane Center has increased its chance of development to 20%. 97L’s circulation continues to be moderate and in the past day has realigned with the thunderstorm activity, which is likely why NHC gave the go to invest the wave and begin running models on it. This wave continues to be in some moderate wind shear, 10-15 knots, and sea surface temperature is around average, 28° C (82° F), which is warm enough to support tropical development. Many of the track models are forecasting 97L to continue trekking west into the Caribbean, crossing the Lesser Antilles around July 1.

Angela

I expected to lay down and pass out, but that has not been the case.  Once I overcame the heat issue I realized there were mosquitoes in the cabin.  I finally smashed one on the wall and he had obviously fed a bit as evidenced by the blood.  The second one was so gorged that it couldn’t fly.  I didn’t smash it, I simply touched it and it exploded.  There was so much blood that it puddled on the pillow case.  I killed a couple of non-bleeders and then feel asleep for about 2 hours.  Then I woke up gaging from cigarette smoke.  The aft portholes were cracked open to allow some of the heat to escape.  Apparently one of our adult leaders was on the dock smoking.  I was too tired to get up, get dressed and go yell at him/her.  So I closed the portholes and tried to go back to sleep.  But I wound up writing this post instead.  Nows it’s 02:35 and I am going back to bed.

Capt. Steve Willis
PADI CD-39713
Professional Scuba Bum™
Aboard S/V Escape 

It’s 13:36 (1:36 pm).  I am sitting in a large classroom with 39 fellow PADI Course Director candidates.  Before lunch we were told that not all candidates have been successful.  Most of us are so nervous we want to puke.  I thought I was stressed before arriving.  Now I KNOW I’m stressed.  Deep breaths.  Don’t pass out.  Don’t poop your pants.  There are many thoughts rushing through my mind.  I committed a faux pas on Tuesday afternoon.  All other components have been very good.  Will that one mistake be deemed my Achille’s heel?  Mind games.  Some candidates are fussing over trash cans; no one wants to puke on the carpeting.

To distract myself, I jumped on the Nation Data Buoy Center website.  The GREAT news is the buoy at Molasses Reef (near Tavernier in the Upper Keys) has reported wind speeds in the single digits for the past 6 hours.  I am sure the staff and participants at the Florida Sea Base are very pleased to get a break from the wind and rain.

Captain Rich Beliveau has volunteered to pick me up at the airport Friday afternoon.  I am assuming he has some business to conduct in Miami or he REALLY wants to get away from the base.

It’s 16:30 and I have finally had my 2 minute interview.  I have passed the course!  Now to the room to change clothes and then onto a bus to go to a resort owned restaurant for the graduation banquet.  There are mixed emotions.  Not all of us are leaving Punta Cana with our PADI Course Director credentials in hand.  There is a shared feeling of disappointment for those who have more to do, yet elation for those of us who have completed the course.

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Now it’s 22:40 (10:40 pm).  We have returned to the hotel.  I am in the lobby finishing this post.  Curtis Wilson is setting nearby.  Curtis had the room next to mine, was on the same team and sat next to me in class.  (We had assigned seating.)  Curtis really helped me through some of the tougher times.  There are MANY people that I need to thank for my success.  But I don’t want to leave anyone out and I’m too tired to feel confident that I won’t mess up.  So I’ll post on that in the next few days.

A few of us are hoping to share a shuttle to the airport at about 10:30 tomorrow.  The flight doesn’t leave until 13:30 but I think we have to clear through US Customs before we depart.  Plus, I don’t have an assigned seat and have to take care of that in the morning.

So thank you all who helped me in this journey.  Now a new chapter begins.

Capt. Steve Willis
Professional Scuba Bum™
PADI Course Director 39713

28Jun

FINAL EVALUATION

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We make our final presentations this morning.  I am not yet clear on the exact process, but we will meet with an evaluator or team of evaluators later this morning and into the afternoon to receive counseling on our good and bad points and if we have been deemed worthy of the title PADI Course Director.  There are rumors within the PADI family that once accepted to the Course Director Training Course you are certain to leave as a Course Director.  That is NOT true.  As the wise man said, “It ain’t over ’til it’s over” and for some, the rodeo will not be over by the end of this course.  So the stress and tension remains for at least several more hours.  This has not been the all-time most stressful challenge of my life, but it has to be in the top two or three.  Good or bad, it will be over in another 15 hours.

The National Weather Service forecast for the Florida Sea Base is much improved compared to last week:

Today: A chance of showers and thunderstorms, mainly after 8am. Partly sunny, with a high near 92. West wind around 5 mph. Chance of precipitation is 30%.
Tonight: A chance of showers and thunderstorms, mainly before 11pm. Partly cloudy, with a low around 80. West wind around 5 mph. Chance of precipitation is 30%.
Friday: A slight chance of showers and thunderstorms. Mostly sunny, with a high near 93. Northwest wind around 5 mph. Chance of precipitation is 20%.
Friday Night: A slight chance of showers and thunderstorms. Partly cloudy, with a low around 80. West wind between 5 and 10 mph. Chance of precipitation is 20%.
Saturday: A slight chance of showers and thunderstorms. Partly sunny, with a high near 92. North wind around 5 mph becoming south. Chance of precipitation is 20%.
Saturday Night: A slight chance of showers and thunderstorms. Partly cloudy, with a low around 80. Chance of precipitation is 20%.
Sunday: A slight chance of showers. Partly sunny, with a high near 92. Chance of precipitation is 10%.
Sunday Night: A slight chance of showers. Mostly cloudy, with a low around 80. Chance of precipitation is 10%.
Monday: A slight chance of showers. Partly sunny, with a high near 92. Chance of precipitation is 10%.
Monday Night: A slight chance of showers. Mostly cloudy, with a low around 81. Chance of precipitation is 10%.
Tuesday: A slight chance of showers and thunderstorms. Partly sunny, with a high near 92. Chance of precipitation is 20%.
Tuesday Night: A slight chance of showers and thunderstorms. Mostly cloudy, with a low around 82. Chance of precipitation is 20%.
Independence Day: A slight chance of showers and thunderstorms. Partly sunny, with a high near 91. Chance of precipitation is 20%.

However, it looks like we have a good chance of a few more “wind events” this summer.  The air temperature has jumped about 10 degrees in the last two weeks.  We are now looking at daily highs of 92-93ºF and overnight lows of 80ºF.  This is generally as hot as the ocean will allow us to get in the Florida Keys.  Summer has definitely arrived.

I haven’t received any updates on the staff flu epidemic.  Hopefully they have survived the plague.  I will get in too late Friday to get a full report, but should get caught up on the current status of Florida Sea Base staff and operations on Saturday.  Captain Rich is off on Saturday’s so I may not get a full briefing until Sunday.

Okay; deep breaths.  Here I go again.  I’m too old for this 05:00 to 22:30 (11:30 pm) routine.  Even our “day off” was a long, stress filled day.  I certainly owe Captain Rich Beliveau, Scuba Commissioner Laura Kuras and the seasonal staff at the Florida Sea Base a huge debt of gratitude for holding the place together during two trying weeks.

Capt. Steve Willis
Professional Scuba Bum™
Last working day of the CDTC

 

The center of Tropical Storm Debby is hundreds of miles from the Florida Sea Base but still causing major impacts on regularly scheduled programming.  However, all that can be done is being done to make this as pleasant of an event as possible.  The most important thing is to keep the participants safe and that is being accomplished.

The National Weather Service forecast for the Florida Sea Base Is:

Today: A chance of showers and thunderstorms, mainly after 2pm. Mostly cloudy, with a high near 89. Windy, with a south wind between 20 and 25 mph. Chance of precipitation is 30%.
Tonight: A chance of showers and thunderstorms, mainly before 10pm. Mostly cloudy, with a low around 81. Breezy, with a south wind around 20 mph. Chance of precipitation is 40%.
Wednesday: A chance of showers and thunderstorms, mainly after 2pm. Partly sunny, with a high near 91. South wind around 15 mph. Chance of precipitation is 30%.
Wednesday Night: A chance of showers and thunderstorms, mainly before 10pm. Mostly cloudy, with a low around 81. South wind around 15 mph. Chance of precipitation is 30%.
Thursday: A chance of showers and thunderstorms. Partly sunny, with a high near 92. West wind around 15 mph. Chance of precipitation is 30%.
Thursday Night: A chance of showers and thunderstorms. Partly cloudy, with a low around 81. Chance of precipitation is 30%.
Friday: A chance of showers and thunderstorms. Mostly sunny, with a high near 93. Chance of precipitation is 30%.
Friday Night: A chance of showers and thunderstorms. Partly cloudy, with a low around 81. Chance of precipitation is 30%.
Saturday: A slight chance of showers and thunderstorms. Mostly sunny, with a high near 93. Chance of precipitation is 20%.
Saturday Night: A slight chance of showers and thunderstorms. Mostly clear, with a low around 82. Chance of precipitation is 20%.
Sunday: A slight chance of showers and thunderstorms. Mostly sunny, with a high near 93. Chance of precipitation is 20%.
Sunday Night: A slight chance of showers and thunderstorms. Partly cloudy, with a low around 81. Chance of precipitation is 20%.
Monday: A slight chance of showers and thunderstorms. Mostly sunny, with a high near 93. Chance of precipitation is 20%.

If you read through the forecast, you will see the word “sunny” on Thursday.

We are having effects from T/S Debby about 2,000 miles away in the Dominican Republic.  We are being bused two hours each way today to reach calmer waters for our open water and rescue evaluations.  You could surf off the beach in Punta Cana this morning.

The PADI Course Director Training Course is in high gear with multiple evaluations being conducted each day.  But there is light at the end of the tunnel (finally).  We are SLAMMED with evals today and tomorrow.  Then we have one evaluation on Thursday morning.  The remainder of Thursday is dedicated to some final lectures by the staff and individual counseling.  Thursday night we will have a victory dinner and I fly back to the USA on Friday.  I have been doing well, but not perfect.  I am averaging about 96% if you bundle everything together.  Most of us are exhausted enough to have switched from the terrified mode to the survival mode.  But at the same time, team spirit and cooperation remains high.  Most of the candidates are in the same boat as me, happy to be performing well, but disappointed to not be scoring even higher.  We are a STRONGLY motivated group.

I am very sorry to hear that so many of the staff have the flu.  (1) Wash your hands.  (2) Stop kissing each other.  (3) Everyone must be cured before I return Friday (about dinner time).

Wow.  I woke up extra early this morning, but I am out of time.  Hang on to your hats.  Batten down the hatches.  Lash yourself to the mast.  Deploy the life rafts.  Do what you have to do to be safe.  Then do what you can to enjoy the day.  Some of the staff were hoping to have a severe weather experience this summer.  I hope this is the beginning and end of that. 🙂

Capt. Steve Willis
Professional Scuba Bum™
CD minus 3 days and counting

25Jun

OMG

The weather has been very challenging to say the least. I am very proud of our staff enduring the weather and wind as they have.

The scuba boats sat on the wall today. Scuba Commissioner Laura Kuras held the scuba team together keeping the scouts busy for the better part of the day. She is quite amazing with her attitude of keeping the participants happy and in good spirits. That’s why she gets paid the big bucks.

On the sailing side of life my sailing commissioner got to play on the sailboats today. Needless to say the little hunters are flying across the bay. Capt. Dutch was also nominated to be a hunter captain as well. With this much wind we need our game on.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Compliments of Captain Harmon on the S/V Dutch Love

I received a call from one of our big schooners wanting to hide from the wind. I get quite a chuckle out of it when we have our college kids doing laps around the bay and our 80’ schooners are looking for cover. In all fairness to the big boats our little harbor is protected well from most directions and we’re able to provide program 99 percent of the time.

The flue has definitely hit the Sea Base. Half of our scuba captains have it and it is making its way through the sailing staff. I never ever get sick and I managed to take the hit. ½ a bottle of cough syrup and enough vitamin C to gag a maggot and I still feel rotten. Oh well suck it up and quit whining.

Former staff member Captain Dave Rumbaugh birthday is today. He was a coral reef mate that went dive master and has worked his way up to captain. He’s working at Cheeca Lodge now. He’s doing well with his new life away from Sea Base. Another success story of one of the sea base staff that never left the keys.

Be Safe,
Capt Rich

23Jun

HALF WAY

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We have reached the midpoint of the 2012 Dominican Republic PADI Course Director Training Course.  We made a 20 minute open water dive today at an unnamed site on the reef line about a mile off the coast.  The conditions were decent with 84ºF water and 30′ of visibility.  The corals on the reef were healthy.  We spent about 10 minutes on a training exercise and then were allowed 10 minutes to explore the reef.  The lack of fish was shocking.  I tried to count every fish I saw.  The total was less than 40 individual fish in 10 minutes.

The weather for the Florida Sea Base looks like it may be improving soon.  Invest 96L has been upgraded to Tropical Storm Debby.  The consensus seems to be the storm will track towards Texas.

Click to enlarge.

However, computer models are still in significant disagreement.

Click to enlarge.

The US model has the system going west.  The European model has it moving east.

Captain Rich posted earlier today about the local weather at the Florida Sea Base.  Conditions seem to be pretty nasty, but nothing of serious concern.  Captain Rich, Commissioners Laura Kuras and Stephanie Mansburger, the captains and seasonal staff will work together to ensure the participants have a safe and rememberable adventure.   I’m sorry I’m not there to help.  This is the third time in a row that the weather has turned horrible while I was away from the base.

We are scheduled to go on a real dive Sunday morning and then we have the rest of the day to work on a bazillion training presentations that we have yet to make.  If I can make time, I hope to travel into “the village” Sunday to pick up some fruit juice and snacks.  At resort prices of $3.00 per soft drink and almost $2.00 for 8 ounce bottles of water, it is worth making a trip to the market.

Enjoy the rest of your weekend.

Capt. Steve Willis
Professional Scuba Bum™
República Dominicana

Well so much for good enough weather to dive in. Also the lack of lightning passed in a hurry. Last night about 3AM we got pounded pretty well by weather and a serious light show. Nobody reported having a strike, but there was a lot of energy flying around.

Captains Christy and Joey took the divers out for their last dives. Before they hit the reef line they were experiencing 6-8’s. They opted for a little flatter water. Capt Scott reported the BSA Burglar is running and shifting well. Problem solved.

The sailing crews are still hard at it. We blew another jib out today. Seems 25 knots is a little much for these little boats. St. John got a crash course in big are sailing. They haven’t learned the little tricks to depower a boat without having something go terribly wrong.

Check in tomorrow will be a challenge. We have seven scuba adventure crews as well as a certification crew. Everything sounds like it will work out except there are only accommodations for seven crews. So much for computers being smart, it seems our reservation system has allowed one too many crews to book on Sunday. The scuba guys are going to have to invade the sailing dorms for the week.

Both commissioners are doing well keeping things moving. Laura is learning the fine art of pulling things out of thin air. Capt. Steve is definitely missed even though he doesn’t think so. I’m glad he’s doing well in the DR with his diving.
Back to work, I have the day off tomorrow even though I’ll get 25 calls. My record is 96 in one day, 5 back to back without hanging up.

Be safe,
Capt Rich

23Jun

Invest 96L

in Weather  •  0 comments

Thanks for the post Captain Rich.  It’s really nice to read about the sailing staff and activities.  It’s also good to hear that the divers are getting in most of their dives despite the general weather conditions.  It’s disappointing to hear about BSA Burglar butI know that if you can’t fix it no one can.

Here’s a quick update on Invest 96L.  The computer models are very confused by this system.  That could be good news for the Florida Sea Base, but you never want to wish misfortune on others.  It’s weather.  We will see what happens.

Click to enlarge.

Today is our first time to go open water diving at the PADI CDTC in Punta Cana.  Apparently this is not a huge diving destination.  I’ll give more details tomorrow.  Right now I’m running late for the boat.

I appreciate Captain Rich and Laura Kuras taking up the slack.  It’s like I’m not needed there at all. Hummmmm.

Capt. Steve Willis
Professional Scuba Bum™
Ocean bound

All is well at the Florida Sea Base.

The dive staff is performing well while Captain Steve is away to the DR. Scuba Commissioner Laura Kuras has definitely picked up the slack in his absence. The entire staff is very good this year, I’m very proud of them.

Captain Scott had the night dive last night on board the BSA Adventure. He had weather all around him but managed to dodge the storms and mess. All dive crews made all real dives today and yesterday.

The BSA Tarpon passed its annual USCG safety examination with Capt Steve Harrison and crew performing well. There were a few minor deficiencies, but considering the age of the boat she is doing well. Captain Steve and I will get everything fixed in short order.

The BSA Burglar is having shifting issues. Even brand new boats have issues. Marine Superintendant Mike Stohler called Newton Boats to get another shift assembly. Captain Joey and I took the thing apart this morning to see what might be causing the problems. As soon as he gets in we’ll give it a go and see what happens.

Today is a huge sailing day. We have nine boat arrivals going somewhere on a sailboat. Five Coral Reef, two Eco Adventure and two Scuba Live a boards. Speaking of Scuba Live A Boards I saw Captains Mike and Kelly yesterday the SLA captains. They looked happy and are doing well. I was contacted by a 65’ schooner that wants in next year as a scuba boat. They seem very interested, but time will tell. There are many whoops to jump through before it becomes a reality.

The sailors on the beach for shore leave are having so much fun. They have enough experience to safely come and go, but being young adults sometimes don’t know that they should be scared at times. I know one captain that has never learned this, but all is well. I rode the bike out to watch them buzz around the harbor; it’s a lot of fun watching them have fun. Parents have no idea how much they are missing by not getting involved. The scouts enjoy it and maybe even learn something in the process.

Coral Reef Mates Emily and Julie were sitting on the paddle boards singing to the scouts as they went by on boats. They were very amusing watching them work with the kids.

Captain Steve updated everyone on the weather so I’ll skip it. It’s a little gooey out, not much lightning (none so far) and enough wind for the sailors to play and not hurt the scuba divers.

Be safe,
Captain Rich

22Jun

CDTC UPDATE

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I want to thank everyone for the comments, thoughts and prayers regarding my mom passing away.  I cannot express how that makes me feel.  All I can say is thank you.  Reports are that my dad is handling the situation well.  I am staying very busy but still have moments when thoughts of my mom are at the forefront.

The PADI Course Director Training Course (CDTC) is going well and my confidence level is growing thanks to the excellent mentoring of the PADI CDTC staff.  Most of our activities are scored from 1 (not good) to 5 (excellent).  We have completed the Skill Circuit.  During this phase we were required to demonstrate 12 basic scuba skills that are contained primarily in the PADI Open Water Diver course.  Our criteria is not simply performing the skill, but performing the skill in a manner that an instructor candidate could observe our demonstration and then demonstrate the skill to a student diver to a degree that the student could in turn repeat the skill.  I scored 5 on all skills except two where I earned a score of 4 or a total of 58/60.  The minimum score for any one skill on the diving skills was 3 with a required total minimum of 48 of 60 points.

I earned a 5.0 on my Confined Water Teaching Presentation.  We still have uddles of tasks to be scored on (one happens this afternoon) which translates into continued stress and pressure.   The minimum passing score for all of the Confined Water and Open Water presentations is 4.0.  We also have several Knowledge Development presentations to make.  The minimum passing score is 4.0 on those as well.

Many of the items being evaluated are skills that we are very familiar with.  However, we are moving into new materials and presentation requirements that again induce stress.  The bottom line is, so far so good.  There is a lot to do, and although the PADI CDTC staff members are working hard to reduce stress, most of us are still rather nervous about our upcoming opportunities for excellence.

Becoming a PADI Course Director will have several benefits for the Florida Sea Base and the Boy Scouts of America.  This certification is not coincidental with the construction of a $1.5 million aquatic center at the Florida Sea Base.  Our intent is to use these tools during our non-program season to contact more PADI professional level instruction including more Divemaster courses and to finally be able to offer Instructor Development Training (a few Divemasters have expressed interest), and continuing education opportunities for existing PADI Instructors such as Instructor Development Course Staff Instructor (three people have already asked to be in my class) and well as Specialty Instructor Training Courses.  I am also hopeful that we can reorganize our existing Scuba Liveaboard and Scuba Adventure programs to offer more certification options to our participants.  These opportunities will start with crews attending in our spring season (February through April) and hopefully expand to the summer crews as soon as we are able to employ an adequate number of PADI Scuba Instructors.  The possibilities are endless.

Outside of scuba, the new aquatics facility will allow the Florida Sea Base to truly become the premiere aquatics venue within the Boy Scouts of America.  Imagine winter time National Camp Schools.  No longer will camps have to wait until May to have staff attend a NCS.  We can offer training for lifeguard, small boat sailing, motor boating, kayaking, canoeing, standup paddle boarding, aquatics supervision and many other aquatic interests.  The possibilities are limitless.

There are exciting times ahead.  The challenge will be in having the courage to make these opportunities become realities.

The weather system in the Gulf of Mexico has been officially designated Invest 96L.  There should be no significant impact at the Florida Sea Base other than some wind and rain.

Click to enlarge.

Dr. Jeff Masters included the following in his morning post:

By Dr. Jeff Masters

Published: 11:03 AM EDT on June 21, 2012
An area of low pressure and heavy thunderstorms entering the Southern Gulf of Mexico is bringing sporadic heavy rains to Western Cuba and Mexico’s Yucatan Peninsula, and winds of 20 – 25 mph to surrounding ocean areas. This disturbance will need to be watched for development as it drifts slowly northward at about 5 mph into the Central Gulf of Mexico by Saturday. The disturbance is poorly organized, and has only a modest area of heavy thunderstorms. Wind shear is a moderate to high 15 – 25 knots over the region. Ocean temperatures are 81 – 83°F in the Western Caribbean and Southern Gulf of Mexico, which is about 1°F above average, and plenty warm to support formation of a tropical storm.

Forecast for Gulf of Mexico disturbance
Wind shear is predicted to remain in the moderate to high range through Friday. Water vapor satellite loops show a region of dry air over the Northern Gulf of Mexico; this dry air is probably too far away to significantly interfere with development. I expect we will see an increase in the disturbance’s heavy thunderstorm activity today as a result of less interfence from dry air. By Saturday, our two top models, the European model (ECMWF) and GFS, predict that wind shear could fall to the moderate range, 10 – 20 knots, which would potentially allow the disturbance to approach tropical depression status by Sunday. A trough of low pressure pushing off of the U.S. East Coast will be capable of grabbing the disturbance and accelerating it to the northeast on Sunday, as predicted by the GFS model, which takes the disturbance across Florida on Sunday, and into the waters off the coast of South Carolina by Monday. The GFS does not develop the disturbance while it is in the Gulf of Mexico, but suggests it could develop into a tropical or subtropical depression off the coast of South Carolina Monday or Tuesday. The latest ECMWF model run (00 UTC) predicts that this through will not be strong enough to pull the disturbance northeastwards across Florida, and the disturbance will instead linger in the Gulf of Mexico for many days, giving it time to develop into a tropical depression next week. The UKMET and NOGAPS models predict a more westward drift, with the disturbance affecting the Mexico/Texas border region 6 – 7 days from now. At this point, we can’t rule out any location in the Gulf being affected by this system, though the Gulf coast of Florida has the highest probability of seeing impacts. NHC is giving the disturbance a 30% chance of developing into a tropical depression by Saturday morning. This is a reasonable forecast, and the odds will probably rise by Friday, and I give the disturbance a 50% chance of developing into a tropical depression by Monday morning.

Capt. Steve Willis
Professional Scuba Bum™
2012 CDTC, Dominican Republic