Archive for August, 2012

Good evening from the Florida Sea Base.  I’m usually saying, “good morning” but, as mentioned a couple of days ago, I am trying to shift my schedule to make these posts in the evenings.  If you are reading this with your morning coffee on Saturday, bear in mind that it was written on Friday.  I am trying to avoid terms like “today”, “tomorrow” and “yesterday”.  If I use those terms, just look at the date on the post to make sense of my time references.  (This is probably more confusing to me than to you.)

As the news coverage of the misery, loss of property and loss of lives caused by Hurricane Isaac continues, my whining of preparations and recovery from Tropical Storm Isaac are almost embarrassing.  While the toll from Hurricane Isaac will likely continue for another day or so, the good news is the potential drought relief the system may bring to much of the mid-west.  Please keep the survivors of this catastrophe in your prayers.  It could have been us, and next time it might be.

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The weather is very seasonable at the Florida Sea Base with highs in the low 90s, lows in the low 80s, mild to moderate breezes and a 20-30% chance of rain every day which usually amounts to a little 20 minute shower somewhere nearby.

Several more staff members departed Friday and a few more depart Saturday.  The captains are busy as well.  Captain Lou (Louise) of S/V Blue Planet was working feverishly Thursday to assemble a new roller furler to install as a staysail.  She is leaving the boat here but departing for a little while.  She flew back from California to get Blue Planet off the dock for Tropical Storm Isaac.  Captain “Joe” (Giuseppe) is scheduled to arrive today (oops, I mean Friday) with his lovely wife, Rose, to take S/V Rosso di Sera, back home to the west coast of Florida for the remainder of the off-season.    Captains Mike and Kelly have been working on S/V Endeavour and S/V Silent Harmony to prepare them for the return to Captain Giuseppe’s home dock.  (After delivering Rosso, Captain Giuseppe will return for the other two boats.)  Captain Harman has been working hard on S/V Dutch Love.  He is considering making the voyage from the Florida Sea Base to the Honduran island of Roatan on more time.

The staff worked on cleaning up the scuba area, pulling carpet out of the Thomas Building and stripping the Galley.  Captain Rich Beliveau took the day off.  I worked with the staff in the scuba area, placed a $49,000 with Aqua Lung for 2013 scuba gear, and worked on general emails and Divemaster Academy files.  I also cleaned the cockpit up on Escape and moved my personal scuba gear to a more accessible location in the scuba lockers.  I am going to TRY to sleep in a little tomorrow (I mean Saturday); we’ll see how that works out.

Capt. Steve Willis
Professional Scuba Bum™
PADI Course Director #39713
Aboard S/V Escape 

30Aug

SLIDELL

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My son called me on his way to work Thursday morning.  We had a very pleasant chat.  While we talked, I had The Weather Channel on as part of my normal weather watch routine for the interests of the Florida Sea Base.  Jim Cantore was still reporting from New Orleans.  I think I heard him say “Slidell” four times in 10 seconds while talking about the flooding that’s being caused by Hurricane Isaac.  Then Mike Bettis had an on camera interview with the mayor of Slidell from The Weather Channel studio in Atlanta.

You may be wondering how that relates to the Florida Sea Base.  I’m glad you asked.  Slidell, Louisiana is the home of Newton Boats.  Newton builds our dive boats.  I need to order another Newton dive boat to replace the recently retired BSA Tarpon.  Whatever setbacks are caused to the Newton plant by flooding in Slidell will in turn affect the Florida Sea Base.  The Newton facility is in a VERY low lying area so it is reasonable that they will have some flooding; the Mayor was saying 3′ so far this morning.

Invest 97L has intensified and is now Tropical Storm Leslie.  The system should turn northwest, threatening Bermuda, the northeast US and Canada.  We were expecting a busy hurricane season and it is here.  We are not half way through the season yet and there have been as many storms and hurricanes in an average year.

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While Captain Rich Beliveau, Tim Stanfill, Captain Keith Douglass, Captain Paul Beal and I pulled our hair out (and maybe used a few Scout INappropriate words) working on the 2013 budget, the remaining season staff worked very hard Wednesday removing all of the furniture from the Thomas Building, a three story, hotel type structure.  Hauling furniture down the stairs is an annual event and tough duty.  Funding for the Thomas Building was donated in 1991/1992 by the owners of the Thomas School Bus company.

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Friday’s  breakfast will be the last meal to be served in the Galley as we know it.  The Galley has been remodeled several times over the years.  I know it has NOT been redone in the past 12 years.  So a major overhaul is past due.  The appliances will be upgraded, the plumbing and workspace overhauled, and we will have two serving lines to better accommodate our guests.  I may hold the record for the most meals eaten in the existing Galley due to my tenure.  I do not eat all meals there anymore.  My best guess is about 7,800 meals but an estimate of 10,000 is possible.

I expect to post tomorrow.  Just in case I don’t, please have a great weekend.

Capt. Steve Willis
Professional Scuba Bum™
PADI Course Director #39713
Aboard S/V Escape 

29Aug

SCHEDULE CHANGE

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Wednesday was very nice at the Florida Sea Base with gentle breezes, a high of 90º, and only a “slight chance” of rain which never developed.  We have a better chance of rain this weekend.  All remnants of Tropical Storm Isaac have dissipated in our area as New Orleans and the Gulf Coast continue to deal with Hurricane Isaac.  A graphic like this is a great reminder of how lucky we were when visited by Tropical Storm Isaac.

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Tropical Storm Kirk and Invest 98L are either going or forecasted to go to the northeast and pose no threat to the United States.

If you read this blog on a frequent basis you may have noticed my erratic schedule of late.  There have been two causes, issues caused by T/S Isaac, and the discontinuation of our 07:30 daily staff meetings.  The staff meetings are suspended until the staff returns for the 2012 Divemaster Academy.  Therefore, I don’t have to be up quite so early and the posts are running late. I will post in the evenings so some of you faithful, early morning readers can still have a new post available at that time.  I have tried this before and it didn’t seem to work well, but I will try again.  Also, the posts will likely be much more sporadic for a while.  (1) The program participants and (most) staff are gone.  (2) Due to remodeling of the Galley and Thomas Building (our conference center housing) we will not have any conference participants this fall.  (3) I have a very busy travel schedule this fall and will be away from the base for extended periods of time.

That does not mean the work will diminish.  With a laptop, internet connection and cell phone there is very little if anything that I can’t accomplish on the road that I would be doing sitting in my office.  Our General Manager, Captain Paul Beal, frequently reminds us that family should come first so I am planning to spend as much time as possible with my family in Texas this fall.  I will keep you posted on any major changes and report on the various meetings I will attend including the first ever combined National High Adventure Staff Planning Conference with major players from Philmont Scout Ranch, Northern Tier and the Florida Sea Base having individual camp and combined meetings.  I am also scheduled to attend the BSA National Health and Safety Committee meeting in Dallas, the BSA Aquatics Workshop in Arkansas, and the Diving Equipment Marketing Association (DEMA) show in Las Vegas.

I am enjoying sharing ideas for future program/conference enhancements with Food and Conference Director Tim Stanfill.  Tim is a Boy Scout.  Most of you know what I mean by that. He is working hard to find ways to use our conference season to serve Scouts and Venturers more instead of focusing solely on adult training.  Some of these plans are being formulated around the new swimming pool/dive training complex that will be built this fall/winter/spring.  I think we have some great ideas.  Selling those upstream may be challenging.

Captain Rich and I have completed our 2013 budgets.  That is a relief; it is a stressful chore made more difficult and challenging because, well, the “because” part would get me in trouble.  So I will just say the process could be better managed.

I have completed about 80% of the task of reassembling S/V Escape following T/S Isaac.  I really need to get the sun shades back in place tomorrow. The air conditioners simply cannot stay up with the heat.  I still have several large, hurricane lines to stow plus I think I will put the outboard motor (for the dingy) and grill in a storage locker for now.

Capt. Steve Willis
Professional Scuba Bum™
PADI Course Director #39713
Aboard S/V Escape

Tuesday was a long, hot, hard, exhausting day at the Florida Sea Base.  Recovering from these storms is always harder than the preparations.  I assume that’s because we generally have several days to prepare and the recovery is mostly a one day event.  Regardless, we are thankful that no one was injured and there was no significant property damage – YET.  The VHF antenna tower at the program office broke loose from the mount that attaches it too the building.  If it is not fixed VERY soon it is going to fall.  That has happened before and it took a long time and a lot of money to erect the new one.

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Isaac has finally developed into a category 1 hurricane and made landfall near New Orleans.  My prayers are for minimal damage along the coast and much needed rains throughout the mid-west.  Unfortunately, at of 05:15 this morning, Plaquemines Parish, LA (south of New Orleans) has, and is continuing to receive significant rain, surge and wind damage.  The system seems to have stalled in the southernmost tip of Louisiana.  While the system remains at category 1 strength, the cumulative effects are frightening.  It looks like the rain will not quite reach my dad’s place in southeast Texas.

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Invest 97L intensified and is now Tropical Storm Kirk.  It is making a u-turn and poses no threat to the Florida Sea Base.

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But, now we are watching Invest 98L.  The computer models are suggesting that it will not pose a threat but it is a long way out and conditions could change.

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How about a look at the cutest one year old in the universe?  Josie turned one on 03 August.  I was able to sneak back home for her birthday party and will get to see her again in about 3 weeks.

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With help from several staff members and a few captains, I am back aboard S/V Escape.

Capt. Steve Willis
Professional Scuba Bum™
PADI Course Director #39713
Aboard S/V Escape 

28Aug

RECOVERY

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Monday’s meeting of the Florida Sea Base seasonal staff was delayed until 09:00.  There are no participants here so there was no need to meet at 07:30. We quickly came up with a plan of action; the remaining scuba staff members reported to the scuba area and equipment room to complete year end tasks like inventory while the sailing staff mainly helped the ranger staff with collecting palm fronds and vegetative debris from around the base left by T/S Isaac.  We agreed to meet again at 13:00 to discuss further chores for the day.

After lunch the wind was still screaming, the tasks that could be done were complete so most of the staff took the afternoon off to tend to personal chores and packing.  Captain Rich and I worked on budget.  I placed a $14,000 order with PADI for training materials for the 2013 Scuba Certification crews and $5,300 order with Aqua Lung for overhaul kits for the regulators that will be serviced for use in 2013.  I also contacted Newton Dive Boats to begin the process of ordering another dive boat to replace the retired BSA Tarpon.

Speaking of scuba equipment, the BCs and regulators are now officially available for purchase.  Send an email to fsbscubagear@gmail.com with inquiries.  We have not raised the price from last year.  A BC/reg combo is still $350 plus shipping.  Refer to my post on 15 August 2012 for more details.  The BC/reg retails at $1,065 new.  The equipment is sold “as is” but is operational and in good cosmetic condition.  When making a purchase you will sign an acknowledgement that the equipment should be inspected by an authorized Aqua Lung dealer and serviced as deemed prudent.

Isaac has not reached hurricane status.  We are still getting wind and a little rain from the system.  New Orleans appears to be its next landfall.

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Isaac is large enough that it may bring some rain to my dad’s place in southeast Texas.  The Newton Boat factory is in Slidell, LA, on the northwest side of New Orleans.  I talked with Valerie today and she said they were making hurricane preparations.  I feel their pain!  If all goes well, I hope we can move the boats back to their slips this afternoon so I can sleep aboard S/V Escape tonight.

That’s all for this morning.  Have a great day.  If you are in the New Orleans area please be safe while making your storm preparations.  Our thoughts and prayers are with you.  By Thursday or Friday the mid-west may finally receive some much overdue rain.

Capt. Steve Willis
Professional Scuba Bum™
PADI Course Director #39713
Still hanging out in the scuba dorms

27Aug

ALL SAFE

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The Florida Sea Base braced for a display of Mother Nature’s incredible power.  But the Good Lord looked over us and Mother Nature was kind and “Hurricane” Isaac passed us with less than tropical storm strength winds.  If you have a son, daughter, father, mother, other relative or friend of a staff member who is still at the Florida Sea Base, they have survived the “cone of death”.  We have some standing water from the rains and several palm fronds down from the wind.  According to data from the National Data Buoy System, the maximum wind gust recorded on Molasses Reef (about 26 miles east of the Florida Sea Base) was 41 knots (47 mph) at 11:00.  The maximum wind gust reported at Sombrero Reef (about 25 miles to our west) was 49 knots (56 mph) at 14:00 (2 pm).  The wind is forecasted to be near 10 knots by Tuesday afternoon.  Although we don’t have any remaining participants for this season, my guess is the visibility on the reef will return to normal on Friday.

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Now our attention is being focused on the potential for the system to intensify to as much as a category two hurricane before making landfall.

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I really like the forecast track for Invest 97L.  It is nice to NOT have two threats back to back.

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An incredible amount of work went into securing the Florida Sea Base and vessels for this storm.  We are thankful that no one was injured and there was no significant property damage.

I will leave you with the most recent satellite imagery of still Tropical Storm Isaac, taken about 05:50 this morning.

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I hope you and your family had an enjoyable weekend.  If you are in the future track of Isaac, please prepare for the worst.  I greatly respect the scientists that watch our weather and keep us safe by interpreting the data and providing us information that allows us to make decisions to provide for our own safety.  We realize that weather forecasting is part science and part art.  The computer models over-estimated the impacts of this system at the Florida Sea Base and the Florida Keys in general.  They could under-estimate the conditions at the next landfall.  Please don’t be lulled into a sense of false security because we dodged the bullet here.

Capt. Steve Willis
Professional Scuba Bum™
PADI CD #39713
Riding out Isaac in the Scuba Dorm

Saturday was excruciating.  I hurt EVERYWHERE.  S/V Escape is secured to the best of my abilities.  I believe I have 16 lines out.  16 lines versus 80 mph winds.  Do the lines even have a fighting chance?  A lot of people helped me, some more than others.  If I leave someone out, please pardon my memory.  The list includes Captain Mike Lucivero, Captain Rich Beliveau, Captain Carol Beliveau, Richie Chapman, Erik Bergman, Karren Supplee, David Kirkner, Maggie Wells, Jenna Burton, Captain Derek Polt, Captain Steve Harrison, Tim Stanfill, and probably a dozen that I have left out.  As luck would have it, it rained almost the whole time we were securing the boat (08:00 – 14:00).  As  soon as we finished with Escape the sun came out.

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All remaining participants had departed the base by shortly after lunch time.  Many of the staff have left the base to stay with friends or family.  Some of the staff (including me) have migrated into the participant dorms.

At 2pm Saturday the forecast track for Isaac had moved a little back to the west.  That would put us in the strongest (right-front) quadrant.  The National Weather Service Key West office was forecasting winds of 62 knots (70 mph) to 74 knots (85 mph) for Sunday from 4pm to 8 pm.

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According to our friend and Senior Marine Forecaster with the National Weather Service in Key West, Chip Kasper, we are still expecting 1′ to 3′ of storm surge and “rain fall totals of 6 to 10 inches are possible in the Florida Keys”.

There were no significant changes with the 02:00 NHC update.  The 05:00 update will be out in 10 to 30 minutes but I’m going to try to go back to sleep.  If there are any significant changes I will post them throughout the day.

I hope you are safe and well and are having a good weekend.

I need to remind everyone that this is a private site and is NOT owned, maintained or sanctioned by the Florida Sea Base or the Boy Scouts of America.  Any questions or issued raised by comments on this site should be directed to Captain Steve Willis at 305-393-7373 or Steve.Willis@scouting.org or by clicking on the comment button.  Please do not contact the Florida Sea Base directly.  They are not responsible for any comments made on this site and some of the individuals do not appreciate my blog adding to their workload.  More information can be found on the ABOUT page on this site.

Capt. Steve Willis
Professional Scuba Bum™
PADI CD #39713
Aboard S/V Escape

Copied directly from the 05:00 National Hurricane Center (NWS/NOAA) update: (highlights made by me for emphasis)

HURRICANE CONDITIONS ARE EXPECTED IN THE HURRICANE WARNING AREA IN SOUTHWEST FLORIDA AND THE FLORIDA KEYS ON 
SUNDAY...WITH TROPICAL STORM CONDITIONS EXPECTED BY EARLY SUNDAY. HURRICANE CONDITIONS ARE POSSIBLE IN THE 
HURRICANE WATCH AREA IN SOUTHEAST FLORIDA ON SUNDAY...WITH TROPICAL STORM CONDITIONS EXPECTED IN THE TROPICAL
STORM WARNING AREA IN FLORIDA BY EARLY SUNDAY.
STORM SURGE...THE COMBINATION OF A STORM SURGE AND THE TIDE WILL CAUSE NORMALLY DRY AREAS NEAR THE COAST TO BE FLOODED BY RISING WATERS. THE WATER COULD REACH THE FOLLOWING DEPTHS ABOVE GROUND IF THE PEAK SURGE OCCURS AT  THE TIME OF HIGH TIDE...

SOUTHWEST FLORIDA COAST...3 TO 5 FT
SOUTHEAST FLORIDA COAST AND THE FLORIDA KEYS...1 TO 3 FT
HISPANIOLA AND EASTERN CUBA...1 TO 3 FT
THE BAHAMAS AND TURKS AND CAICOS...1 TO 3 FT

THE DEEPEST WATER WILL OCCUR ALONG THE IMMEDIATE COAST IN AREAS OF ONSHORE FLOW. SURGE-RELATED FLOODING DEPENDS ON THE RELATIVE TIMING OF THE SURGE AND THE TIDAL CYCLE...AND CAN VARY GREATLY OVER SHORT DISTANCES. FOR 
INFORMATION SPECIFIC TO YOUR AREA...PLEASE SEE PRODUCTS ISSUED BY YOUR LOCAL WEATHER SERVICE OFFICE. NEAR THE
COAST...THE SURGE WILL BE ACCOMPANIED BY DANGEROUS WAVES.

SURF...DANGEROUS SURF AND RIP CURRENT CONDITIONS WILL AFFECT PUERTO RICO...HISPANIOLA...THE BAHAMAS...THE TURKS AND CAICOS...EASTERN AND CENTRAL CUBA...AND THE EAST COAST OF FLORIDA AND THE FLORIDA KEYS DURING THE NEXT 
COUPLE OF DAYS. PLEASE CONSULT PRODUCTS FROM YOUR LOCAL WEATHER OFFICE FOR MORE INFORMATION.

NEXT ADVISORY
-------------
NEXT INTERMEDIATE ADVISORY...800 AM EDT.
NEXT COMPLETE ADVISORY...1100 AM EDT.

$$
FORECASTER BRENNAN/ROBERTs

I’ll post after the 11:00 update if I can but it may be later this afternoon/evening.  Lots to do.

I need to remind everyone that this is a private site and is NOT owned, maintained or sanctioned by the Florida Sea Base or the Boy Scouts of America.  Any questions or issued raised by comments on this site should be directed to Captain Steve Willis at 305-393-7373 or Steve.Willis@scouting.org or by clicking on the comment button.  Please do not contact the Florida Sea Base directly.  They are not responsible for any comments made on this site and some of the individuals do not appreciate my blog adding to their workload.  More information can be found on the ABOUT page on this site.

Capt. Steve Willis
Professional Scuba Bum™
PADI CD #39713
Aboard S/V Escape

After the 2 pm storm update it was all cheers around the Florida Sea Base; the storm track had been moved west of Key West and it looked like it would continue slipping that direction.  But then the 5 pm update was released and showed the track right back over the top of us.  Every update since then has been gloomier than the last.  As of 02:00, we are expecting sustained winds of 69 mph with gusts to 83 mph from the south from 20:00 (8pm) to 23:00 (11pm) Sunday.

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Friday was a day of mixed activities at the Florida Sea Base.  One Coral Reef Sailing crew was out for most of the day.  The four Scuba Adventure crews made a day of it.  The captains reported rough conditions.  The divers reported that it was the best dives of the week (underwater).  The remaining staff spent another day of making hurricane preparations.

Final storm preparations must happen early today.  Tomorrow is going to be unpleasant.  The forecasters are starting to talk about storm surge.  Due to the large size of the system we may be in store for 2 to 4 feet of surge.  Surge does NOT include the wave heights.  So four feet of surge with just two feet waves equals 6 feet of water above normal tide level.  That puts out T-Dock  under water and potentially 100% of the land at the Florida Sea Base could be covered by saltwater.  Rain of 4″ to 8″ is likely with maximum accumulations of 12″ possible (on top of the surge and waves).

The computer models are still having a hard time getting a handle on Invest 97L.  However, we are going to continue watching the system.

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When some of you are anxious for the most information possible, I have the least amount of time to provide it.  My priorities this morning are the safety of participants and staff, securing my personal vessel, and any last minute preparations for the base.  It will be a mentally and physically exhausting day.  The situation could get a little better in the next three hours, but if not, I will have to pull the plug on the scuba divers.  Safety first!

I will post when time and circumstances allow.  The Florida Sea Base administrative offices are closed for the weekend.  They are NOT closed due to the weather; they are closed every weekend.  They may be open Monday depending on the storm surge status.

I hope you enjoyed this post.  I need to remind everyone that this is a private site and is NOT owned, maintained or sanctioned by the Florida Sea Base or the Boy Scouts of America.  Any questions or issued raised by comments on this site should be directed to Captain Steve Willis at 305-393-7373 or Steve.Willis@scouting.org or by clicking on the comment button.  Please do not contact the Florida Sea Base directly.  They are not responsible for any comments made on this site and some of the individuals do not appreciate my blog adding to their workload.  More information can be found on the ABOUT page on this site.

Capt. Steve Willis
Professional Scuba Bum™
PADI CD #39713
Aboard S/V Escape

24Aug

BACK SURGERY

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I had an MRI a few months ago.  Disk L7-S1 was torn.  If the excruciating pain is an indication, it may now be gone.  If anyone happens to be cousins with the best back surgeon in the known universe, please email me at steve.willis@scouting.org.  Carrying 45 pound anchors and outboard motors on rocking boats and across gaps between said vessel and the dock has me almost bed ridden.  I have some limited time this fall/winter to get this fixed.  But I need to be able to go diving by mid December for the 2012 Divemaster Academy.

Several people were kind enough to help me out yesterday while preparing S/V Escape for the imminent storm.  Captain Bruce from S/V Barefoot, Captain Drew from S/V Comfort Zone II, Galley Mate Brandon and Coral Reef Mate Aaron were life savers.  And CAPTAIN RICHARD T. BELIVEAU who despite more pain than I can imagine, helps everyone with everything all of the time.  If you search this site for “Saint Michael” you can read some of my comments of admiration for one of the least selfish, most caring, most giving men to have ever graced my life.

The Coral Reef Sailing crew from S/V Pirate’s Choice completed their Florida Sea Base adventure this afternoon.  The crew will depart tomorrow morning.  There is one more Coral Reef Sailing crew still on the water, aboard S/V Tradewind.  They are scheduled to end their adventure on Sunday and go home on Monday.  However, the trip may end at any time in the next couple of days for either of two reasons; (1) Monroe County may issue a mandatory evacuation of non-residents order or (2) Captain Martin Ivey may receive instructions from the vessel’s owner to secure it at a harbor of safe refuge.

Speaking of safe refuge, two more of the Florida Sea Base dive vessels were put on the hard in Marathon yesterday afternoon.  That leaves only one vessel available for our remaining divers.  The boat will be crowded tomorrow, assuming the wind conditions allow us to go out.  Most of the sail boats have left the Florida Sea Base dock for safer harbors.  Captain Rich’s schooner, Sienna Belle has too deep draft to fit into any of the more protected locations so we will secure his vessel in place.  I will be the last one to leave the dock.  But if time doesn’t allow, I may have to secure S/V Escape in place as well.  I have another day or two to work that out.  I have prepared the boat except for removing the bimini and dodger.  I will wait as long as possible because it is really a mess coming below when it’s raining with no cover over the cockpit.

Tropical Storm Isaac is about 1,000 miles from the Florida Sea Base.  The models were in agreement yesterday that the system would cross the Florida Keys.  The storm was approximately 1,000 miles in diameter so the leading edge is less than 500 miles away.   The National Weather Service and the National Hurricane Center, or NOAA if you prefer, do a great job of predicting a storm’s path.  But the intensity forecast is still less certain.  The forecast for the system’s strength has waiver between tropical storm and category 1 status.  But experience has taught us that it could self destruct or arrive as a major hurricane.  “Hope for the best but prepare for the worst” is never more accurate than when preparing for a hurricane.  We have been caught napping a couple of times.  “Prepare for the worst” is the only reasonable course of action any time you find yourself in the “cone of death”.

By the end of today we should be about as ready as we can be for Tropical Storm/Hurricane Isaac.  The forecast this morning is a little encouraging; the center of the track has moved from very near the Florida Sea Base down to Key West and we are (again) at tropical storm status instead of category 1 hurricane status.

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It is common for the news and weather companies to focus on the immediate issues but we don’t want to loose site of what’s on the horizon.  Tropical Depression Joyce has been forecasted to curve north and east since its beginning.  But the track of newly designated Invest 97L is less certain.

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With Tropical Storm/Hurricane Isaac rapidly approaching we need to not get totally focused on this single system.  We are into the most aggressive part of hurricane season.  High Adventure!

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We have a little wind this morning but that is not related to Isaac.  Puerto Rico is experiencing rain and near calm wind.

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I hope you enjoyed this post.  I need to remind everyone that this is a private site and is NOT owned, maintained or sanctioned by the Florida Sea Base or the Boy Scouts of America.  Any questions or issued raised by comments on this site should be directed to Captain Steve Willis at 305-393-7373 or Steve.Willis@scouting.org or by clicking on the comment button.  Please do not contact the Florida Sea Base directly.  They are not responsible for any comments made on this site and some of the individuals do not appreciate my blog adding to their workload.  More information can be found on the ABOUT page on this site.

Capt. Steve Willis
Professional Scuba Bum™
PADI CD #39713
Aboard S/V Escape

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